What You Need To Know Before Traveling to Bhutan

Access the road less traveled this year by taking on our exclusive and exciting Bhutan photo tour, departing later this year. Read up on what to expect and why you should join us in this fun adventure! Come prepared Bhutan is a relatively conservative nation, with its people still playing catch up with the rest […]

  • November 13, 2019

Access the road less traveled this year by taking on our exclusive and exciting Bhutan photo tour, departing later this year. Read up on what to expect and why you should join us in this fun adventure!

Come prepared

bhutan roads

Bhutan is a relatively conservative nation, with its people still playing catch up with the rest of the world. Do not expect the usual conveniences of modern travel like, having access to functioning ATMs, fast internet or reliable transit systems.  Instead, be open to enlightening experiences such as taking the time to understand the Bhutanese’s cultural and spiritual beliefs.

Take note of the basics

Bhutanese roads are windy, so it’s best to take anti-nausea medication before setting out for a drive. Remember that, while you’re not expected to leave a tip in hotels or restaurants, you do, however, have to tip your guide.

If you’re particular about your schedule, take note of the peak and non-peak seasons. Most tourists prefer the spring season from March to May and fall season from September to November. Non-peak season, on the other hand, cover the months of December to February and June to August. Your travel dates will also determine the daily traveler tariff, as it’s currently at US$250 per day during peak season and it’s US$200 during non-peak.

Ask before you shoot

ask before you shoot

Be respectful and ask permission before you take a picture. While it’s natural for most travelers to be snap-happy, most locals believe that photos and videos taken of them contain a part of their soul that could then be potentially used for black magic. There might also be attractions such as temples or monasteries that restrict photography.

Pay it forward

Most of your travel expenses such as lodging and entrance fees will already be covered by the daily traveler tariff. However, if you have a little more leeway in your budget, a small donation to a monastery you’re visiting will go a long way. These will help pay for the monks’ food, clothing and transportation expenses.

bhutan temple

You can also choose to stay with a family through a homestay, where you will not only experience an authentic living experience, but you’ll also get to share memories with a Bhutanese family.

Be respectful

be respectful

Remember to pay respect, especially if you’re visiting a temple. Take off your shoes before entering one, and if possible, explore it and walk in a clockwise direction. Never climb ancient ruins and don’t touch sacred objects. Take note that as a conservative country, it is better to dress conservatively as well – avoid short skirts and sleeveless tops, and opt to cover your shoulders and legs if possible.

Have you signed up yet for our Bhutan photo tour? Our resident travel expert will be touring a lucky few in Bhutan this coming November. For more details, send us an email at inquiry@travelwithaccess.com or call us at 534-0116.

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