How to Say Hello in Seven Languages

Traveling is a great way to widen your knowledge and what better way to kick off your adventure by learning the local language. We’ll help you enrich your trips and extend the learning experience by knowing to say the simplest of words: hello! Arabic marhaba (mar-hah-baa) Used in informal situations with friends or family. When […]

  • November 13, 2019

Traveling is a great way to widen your knowledge and what better way to kick off your adventure by learning the local language. We’ll help you enrich your trips and extend the learning experience by knowing to say the simplest of words: hello!

Arabic

marhaba (mar-hah-baa)

Used in informal situations with friends or family. When meeting someone for the first time, one can also opt to use the more polite and formal greeting of as salaam alaikum (as-salaam-alaykum), which translates to “peace be unto you”.

Balinese

Om swastiastu

balinese

This is a traditional way of saying hello in Bali, which translates to “peace and greetings form God”. It is a wish for another’s well-being, usually partnered with clasped hands and a bow.

French

bonjour (bon-zhoor)

The French are very keen on greetings, as they believe it is an important way to show respect. There are two ways of addressing a person, the more formal or polite way using Vous or a more casual way using Tu. To keep it simple however, one can stick to bonjour, as this applies to any setting.

Italian

ciao (chow)

This is the typical greeting among friends and family, an informal and casual way to say hello. You can also use salve (sahl-veh), used when you’re not familiar with the person, or ciao a tutti (chow ah too-tee) when addressing a group.

Japanese

konnichiwa (ko-nee-chee-wah) 

The greeting should come with a slight bow, a sign of respect for the Japanese people. Shaking hands is not usual practice, so take note that you must return the bow if your new Japanese friend greets you with one. One must also switch to konbanwa (kohn-bahn-wah) if you happen to greet someone in the evening.

Spanish

hola (oh-la)

spanish

Quick and easy greeting! Other ways to say hello include ¿cómo estás? (coh-moh ehs-tahs), typically used when speaking informally with a friend or a peer, or ¿qué tal? (kay-tal) which translates to “what’s up?”.

Thai

sawasdee (sah-wah-dee)

This greeting is usually partnered with a wai and a smile. The wai is part of the Thai culture, bowing with your hands clasped in front of your chest, fingertips pointed toward the chin and the head dipped slightly. Men use sawasdee khrup (sah-wah-dee-kap) and women use sawasdee kah (sah-wah-dee-khaaa).

Make good use of your new language skills by booking a trip with us! For more information, please give us a call at (02) 534-0116 or email us at inquiry@travelwithaccess.com.

Photo Credits: Balinese, Spanish

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